News: National Psychoanalytic Association Bestows Annual CORST Essay Prize

 
National Psychoanalytic Association Bestows Annual CORST Essay Prize
 
New York, NY – (January 11, 2017) – The American Psychoanalytic Association’s Committee on Research and Special Training (CORST) has awarded its annual essay prize to Christine Maksimowicz,  Ph.D. for her paper, Poverty, Parenting, and the Foreclosure of "Ordinary Devotion": Rethinking Winnicott Socioanalytically. The essay applies literary and sociological studies of the effects of social class and poverty on self-esteem to developmental psychoanalytic models. 
 
“While influenced by psychoanalytic concepts, Dr. Maksimowicz brings her research and expertise to suggest important contextual variables that impact on parenting and the structuring of subjectivity. Her attention to the mutual influences of psychoanalysis with other fields in the human sciences represents the values and goals of the CORST program,” said Lewis Kirshner, M.D., chair of the prize committee.
 
Maksimowicz is currently a fellow at the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis and working on a monograph entitled, "Who Do You Think You Are?": Recovering the Self in the Working-Class Escape Narrative, a project that explores unrecognized classed injury in fiction and the pivotal roles imagination and self-narration may play in recuperative processes. Her work exploring the theoretical implications of a class-centered analysis of trauma has been published in the Journal of Literature and Trauma Studies. Last year she was the Boston Psychoanalytic Society & Institute’s Silberger Scholar. Since joining APsaA's work group, Psychoanalysis and Undergraduate Education, she has begun developing a Certificate Program in Psychoanalytic Studies through the New England Five College Consortium that will offer an interdisciplinary course of study to students at Amherst College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
“This paper emerged from the ideas explored in the discussion group, Applying Historical and Social Factors in Clinical Psychoanalysis, that formed last January. I'm both delighted and honored to return to the national meeting as the CORST Prize winner to contribute to this important new direction in psychoanalysis," said Christine Maksimowicz, Ph.D.
 
The CORST Essay Prize of $1,000 is awarded annually to the author who submits an outstanding essay using psychoanalytically informed research in the biobehavioral sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. For more information about the prize visit, www.apsa.org.
 
About APsaA
The American Psychoanalytic Association is a professional organization of psychoanalysts with approximately 3,000 members. The Association is comprised of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, educators, researchers and students who have an interest in psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy.  Visit www.apsa.org for more information.